Emi Kodama, At the tip of your pencil

Photo credit: Paul McGlee

Click here to listen the instructions for At the tip of your pencil 

You are invited to listen to a story which guides you in making a drawing while blindfolded.
You are asked to imagine their mind’s eye at the tip of their pencil and draw what you see in your inner landscape. Drawing helps concentrate imagination and the experience of looking is more important than the result. I begin by telling you a story that take you into the forest.
The resulting drawing isn’t important at all. It’s simply the residue of the internal journey you take.”

Material needed : 
– blindfold
– pencil
– paper (preferably A3)
– headphones (recommanded)

Duration : 12 min

Prepare the paper and pencil and launch the mp3. Emi Kodama’s voice will guide you.

Keywords : imagination, landscape, drawing, blindness, focus, hand, interiority



Emi Kodama

Through a multidisciplinary practice that includes writing, performance, and installation, Emi layers elements of daily life with dreams and memories to create stories that people can explore and expand. Her work blends your inner world with hers. She wants to give others the opportunity to spend time in their mental space — for them to be curious, ask questions, and realize the power of their own imagination.

Emi is a Japanese-Canadian artist from Vancouver and has been in Belgium since 2008 when she started the post-graduate program at the Higher Institute for Fine Arts (HISK). She holds an MFA from the Frank Mohr Institute (NL) and a BFA from the ArtEZ Institute of the Arts (NL). She lives in Ghent with partner and collaborator Elias Heuninck and their son.

“Stories can take many forms and I make use of their mutable nature through a multidisciplinary practice including video, photography, drawing, writing, and performance. My work focuses on the every day like the short stories of Raymond Carver, who writes about daily struggles with a minimalism that emphasizes brevity and intensity. Similarly, I attempt to be precise about the commonplace in a way that sheds new light on familiar objects and
situations. My work is biographical on the surface, but the initial sense of familiarity is often undermined by gaps in the narrative that leave one with a feeling of alienation. The discrepancy between different parts of my stories
evokes the ambiguity of situations in daily life and the discomfort of facing conflicting thoughts.”

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Emi Kodama’s portfolio